Judy Groves on David King

Artist

Judy Groves on David King

Artist

Judy Groves is an artist living in London. She first met David King in 1972, this resulted in a long collaboration between them.

“In the early 1970s I joined the design teams of Ink Newspaper and Oz Magazine (the so-called Underground Press). At Oz I learnt about ‘camera-ready’ artwork, the pages were put together the same size as the printed publication. Working to a small budget which only allowed for two colours, we would use multiple overlays – double printing the colours and percentage tones.

It was while at Time Out Magazine that I met David. I already admired the way he had transformed the look and content of the Sunday Times Magazine. As art editor at only 22, he introduced a new and dynamic element to the role. Rather than use photographs to illustrate the text, he blasted them across the gutter. For Don McCullin’s photographs of the Vietnam war there are several double-page-spreads following each other, all done with enormous power and conviction.

The same commitment to content is also evident in the powerful posters David made from the mid- 1970s to the late 1980s. His fury about Apartheid in South Africa and the growth of the racist National Front in this country resulted in some of the most forceful and influential graphic work ever produced. David used various devices to get the message across. Heavy sans-serif type underlined by thick slab rules; huge arrows pointing to the need to join a demonstration.”

The influence of David King’s work can still be seen today on the posters produced by left wing organisations.